Posted in Exploring Chiang Mai, Exploring Thailand

Visiting a Hmong hill tribe for New Year!

Visiting a hill tribe has been high on my list of new experiences since I became an Expat in Thailand. So discovering an organised donation trip was right up my street. Joining the party, we followed in convoy up into the stunning mountains of Chiang Mai. We (my boyfriend and I) asked our school for donations and the kids went crazy! We had bags and bags full of clothes, stationery, toys and food, it was so generous! The hard part was trying to fit it all onto a moped!

The drive itself was very scenic, driving past farms, rice fields and tiny little villages hidden in the mountain.That was until disaster struck, our moped caught something and we had an instant flat tyre! Deciding to leave our bike hidden under a tree, we jumped in the back of a songtao. Literally clinging onto the back due to the lack of room, it was an experience I have to admit, not one I’d like to try again though!

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Scenic mountain views!

A Hmong hill tribe New Year is not what was expected at all, in fact the hill tribe village itself wasn’t. It was a tiny village but they had a huge stage and electricity, where Hmong children were showing off well-rehearsed dances in their traditional dress. It was lovely to see and the kids were adorable, it was just not quite what I had in mind.

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Hill tribe dances!

We organised an area for all the party’s donations, I half expected children to be running around choosing their favourite toys from our selection, or taking full advantage of the hundreds of snacks that had just been donated. What I failed to realise until the end of the day was that they had their very own shop, where they sold most of these snacks anyway.

There were some games organised for the children including face painting with the additional use of flour and water. My boyfriend was covered in this flour paste head to toe by the time the kids had been let loose on him. There was a lot of free time to wander around the village. Watching the kids play football with an old used tyre, Lee (my boyfriend) even got involved for a game too!

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Wandering around, the strong smell of farms led me to a small family of pigs and piglets feeding from their mother.

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Adorable family of pigs!

Out of the corner of my eye, I spotted the children’s entertainment, hand-made wooden go-karts which looked like so much fun; I definitely would have had a go if no one was looking!

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Go-karting fun!

 

All in all, it wasn’t quite what I was expecting a hill tribe to be. But that maybe because I was a little naïve of the reality, although I don’t think anyone would expect to see expensive motorbikes all around a Hmong village or teenagers on their iPhone’s. Maybe they would, I don’t know. It was a good experience and I’d like to do it again, but maybe next time it won’t be with an organised trip and I’d like to venture a little further out to see if that makes a difference.

Have you visited a hill tribe in Northern Thailand?

I’d love to hear if your experience is any different to mine!

 

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5 thoughts on “Visiting a Hmong hill tribe for New Year!

  1. A nice post. I’ve visited a few hill tribe villages in Thailand and Laos, Hmong included. Where the village is remote (no road or river transport – you must walk long distances to get there), no telecommunications), life can be very marginal and harsh. Like for the rest of us, 21st century comforts appeal.

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    1. Hi Retrostuart, Thank you for reading! Your comment is exactly what I had in mind but I guess your right about 21st century comforts! I’d to visit a remote hill tribe village and see if there is much of a difference though 🙂

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